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Carbon graphite chunks 10LBS iso formed machinable


Carbon graphite chunks 10LBS iso formed machinable


From: Jane Russo
Subject Carbon graphite chunks 10LBS iso formed machinable
CARBON GRAPHITE ISO CHUNKS 10LBS
More details and pictures below...
YOU GET 10+LBS OF ISO FORMED GRAPHITE CHUNKS
Chunks range from 1/2" to 5" thickness. Length and Width range from 1"x 3" to 6"x 10" sheets or chunks or curves. These are all iso formed, dense and hard carbon graphite. Extruded or sintered is composed of larger grain graphite particles. These are perfect for crucibles, machining for molds or casting. Glass blowers use the sheets for placing hot glass on them to avoid cracking or hairline fractures. Machinists use these for making master molds or parts for molding.
Perfect for sintering your own electrodes for the production of carbon monoxide di-hydrogen...simple process (place two electrodes in water about .25" apart, charge them with 24vac, you can use DC too, and the gas which bubbles out is COH2 which can run cars, trucks and generators)
Pure carbon graphite can be sintered, used for home made resistors, crucibles, giant pencils, lubricant, alloying metals, electrodes, motor brushes, electrical contacts, bushings, bearings, carbon dioxide or monoxide production, pyrotechnics, lathe and mill work and much more. Use colloidal silica to make a mold for metal castings or make your mold and bake the graphite.
Carbon can also be used to make carbon monoxide di-hydrogen gas which can be used in place of gasoline to power motor vehicles.
We have a lot of carbon graphite blocks available, mostly sheets and long blocks up to 24 inches long. Large sheets of graphite are perfect for glass work / glasswork.
Glassworkers lay their hot glass on the graphite so it does not develop cracks or loose heat. Glass molds, metal molds and plastic molds can all be made with graphite blocks.
According to the USGS, U.S. consumption of natural graphite in 2004-05 averaged 43,800 tonnes in end uses such as refractories, steelmaking, expanded graphite, brake linings, and foundry facings-lubricants. GAN (Graphite Advocate News) import-export statistics for 2006 and 2007 indicate the consumption will continue at that level unless steelmaking carbon raiser takes a drastic drop.
Steelmaking: Natural graphite in this end use mostly goes into carbon raising in molten steel, although it can be used to lubricate the dies used to extrude hot steel. Supplying carbon raiser is very competitive, therefore subject to cut-throat pricing from alternatives such as synthetic graphite powder, petroleum coke, and other forms of carbon. A carbon raiser is added to increase the carbon content of the steel to the specified level. A GAN consumption estimate based on USGS U.S. graphite consumption statistics indicates that 10,500 tonnes was used in this end-use in 2005.
Expanded Graphite (including foil and packings): Expanded graphite is made by immersing natural flake graphite in a bath of chromic acid, then concentrated sulfuric acid, which forces the crystal lattice planes apart, thus expanding the graphite. The expanded graphite can be used to make graphite foil or used directly as "hot top" compound to insulate molten metal in a ladle or red-hot steel ingots and decrease heat loss, or as firestops fitted around a firedoor (During a fire, the graphite expands and chars to resist fire penetration and spread.), or to make high-performance gasket material for high-temperature use. After being made into graphite foil, the foil is machined and assembled into the bipolar plates in fuel cells. The foil is made into heat sinks for laptop computers which keeps them cool while saving weight, and is made into a foil laminate that can be used in valve packings or made into gaskets. Old-style packings are now a minor member of this grouping: fine flake graphite in oils or greases for uses requiring heat resistance. A GAN estimate of current U.S. natural graphite consumption in this end use is 8,000 tonnes.
Brake Linings: Natural amorphous and fine flake graphite are used in brake linings or brake shoes for heavier (nonautomotive) vehicles, and became important with the need to substitute for asbestos. This use has been important for quite some time, but nonasbestos organic (NAO) compositions are beginning to cost graphite market share. A brake-lining industry shake-out with some plant closings has not helped either, nor has an indifferent automotive market. According to the USGS, U.S. natural graphite consumption in brake linings was 6,510 tonnes in 2005.
Foundry facings and lubricants: A foundry facing or mold wash is a water-based paint of amorphous or fine flake graphite. Painting the inside of a mold with it and letting it dry leaves a fine graphite coat that will ease separation of the object cast after the hot metal has cooled. Graphite lubricants are specialty items for use at very high or very low temperatures, as a wire die extrusion lubricant, an antiseize agent, a gear lubricant for mining machinery, and to lubricate locks. Having low-grit graphite, or even better no-grit graphite (ultra high purity), is highly desirable. It can be used as a dry powder, in water or oil, or as colloidal graphite (a permanent suspension in a liquid). An estimate based on USGS graphite consumption statistics indicates that 2,200 tonnes was used in this end-use in 2005.
Natural graphite is the substance used as the marking material ("lead") in common pencils, in zinc-carbon batteries, in electric motor brushes, and in some other minor uses.
The major forms of synthetic graphite are as follows:
Synthetic graphite electrodes: These electrodes carry the electricity that heats electric arc furnaces, the vast majority steel furnaces. They are made from petroleum coke after it is mixed with petroleum pitch, extruded and shaped, then baked to sinter it, and then graphitized by heating it above the temperature that converts carbon to graphite. They can vary in size from 6 in. long to 6 ft. in diameter. The graphite electrode market is shrinking: plasma-arc furnaces (no electrodes) are often replacing electric arc furnaces, and the electric arc furnace itself is getting more efficient and making more steel per tonne of electrode. An estimate based on USGS data indicates that graphite electrode consumption was 197,000 tonnes in 2005.
Synthetic graphite powder and scrap: The powder is made by heating powdered petroleum coke above the temperature of graphitization, sometimes with minor modifications. The graphite scrap comes from pieces of unusable electrode material (in the manufacturing stage or after use) and lathe turnings, usually after crushing and sizing. Most synthetic graphite powder goes to carbon raising in steel (competing with natural graphite), with some used in batteries and brake linings. According to the USGS, U.S. synthetic graphite powder and scrap production was 95,000 tonnes in 2001 (latest data).
Graphite (carbon) fiber and carbon nanotubes are also used in carbon fiber reinforced plastics, and in heat-resistant composites such as reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC). Products made from carbon fiber graphite composites include fishing rods, golf clubs, and bicycle frames, and have been successfully employed in reinforced concrete. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber graphite-reinforced plastic composites and grey cast iron are strongly influenced by the role of graphite in these materials. In this context, the term "(100%) graphite" is often loosely used to refer to a pure mixture of carbon reinforcement and resin, while the term "composite" is used for composite materials with additional ingredients.
Synthetic graphite also finds use as a matrix and neutron moderator within nuclear reactors. Its low neutron cross section also recommends it for use in proposed fusion reactors. Care must be taken that reactor-grade graphite is free of neutron absorbing materials such as boron, widely used as the seed electrode in commercial graphite deposition systems- this caused the failure of the Germans' World War II graphite-based nuclear reactors. Since they could not isolate the difficulty they were forced to use far more expensive heavy water moderators. Graphite used for nuclear reactors is often referred to as Nuclear Graphite.
Graphite has been used in at least three radar absorbent materials. It was mixed with rubber in Sumpf and Schornsteinfeger, which were used on U-boat snorkels to reduce their radar cross section. It was also used in tiles on early F-117 Nighthawks.
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Contact: Jane-russo@rockford-industrial.com (Jane Russo)


Carbon graphite chunks 10LBS iso formed machinable